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COVID-19 aftermath: What things will change forever?

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Offline  Re: COVID-19 aftermath: What things will change forever?
Posted: May 09, 2020, 3:22 PM Post
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I haven't golfed in 5 years. If that's the only thing I can do this summer I'll probably give it a go again at some point. Maybe I'll get back into it and that will be my change forever.


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Offline  Re: COVID-19 aftermath: What things will change forever?
Posted: May 09, 2020, 7:30 PM Post
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Things changing, some things which have been mentioned, others that haven't:
1. Cars. Lots of thoughts here, but annual car shows, where people climb around in them might be severely hampered for a few years. Same with buying cars at dealers. Are they going to be sanitized between each person's test drive?
2. Other Expos, shows, etc. Similar to the car shows, are we going to have camper shows, boat shows, sports shows, etc.? Conventions and convention business is also taking ah huge hit.
3. Commuting. Some have theorized that we will cut down on mass transit (I agree) and some have argued we'll use things like Uber more often (not sure about that one), but I wonder if more people will try riding a motorcycle, moped, bike, scooter, walk, etc. to cut down on interactions with others. Doesn't work great in the WI climate, but may increase somewhat. Madisonians already do this much more than Milwaukee, so it could grow in many WI cities.
4. Gardening, home improvements, hobbies, etc. will increase. We will have an economic downturn with this, so these things always go up with poor economies, but this intense impact of staying at home changed people's habits and some will continue with them.
5. Taxes will definitely go up on the local level. Health departments will be revised and modernized, schools will enhance their infrastructure / ability to do remote teaching, government buildings will be modernized to allow more social distancing and automation, convention centers that relied on events / taxes to fund their construction will need assistance, etc.
6. Public transit. Ties into the higher taxes, commuting, etc. These systems run on significant tax dollar subsidies already and if ridership drops there will need to be increased support. I saw that New York Transit has suffered $4 Billion in lost revenue.
7. Internet access. Expect a very strong push for universal, government supported internet access as a way to even educational access / opportunities.
8. Buffets / Fill your drink stations


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Offline  Re: COVID-19 aftermath: What things will change forever?
Posted: May 10, 2020, 9:24 AM Post
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Outlander said:
The days of turning a blind eye to speeding during the pandemic appear to be gone. Speed traps everywhere the last few days, hadn't seen anybody pulled over prior to this since the middle of March.

Not in the Chicago area. Posted speed limit on the Edens is 55, I was doing 73 and people were blowing by me going 80+.


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Online  Re: COVID-19 aftermath: What things will change forever?
Posted: May 10, 2020, 9:33 AM Post
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If this thing fizzles out by the end of the year I don't see any permanent changes to daily life. People will just forget about it eventually and go back to what they did before.

"Dustin Pedroia doesn't have the strength or bat speed to hit major-league pitching consistently, and he has no power......He probably has a future as a backup infielder if he can stop rolling over to third base and shortstop." Keith Law, 2006


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Offline  Re: COVID-19 aftermath: What things will change forever?
Posted: May 10, 2020, 9:36 AM Post
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SoCalBrewfan said:
But public higher education is not, and should not IMO be, a business. It's not about turning a profit or increasing revenues.

You're exactly right - it shouldn't be a business. But if they are going to provide a high quality education at reasonable tuition prices while competitively compensating their employees, maybe they need to think like a business.

The fundamental question that every business owner/CEO/executive asks themselves every day is, "How do we provide the highest quality product or service for our target market at the lowest operating cost while competitively compensating our employees so that they don't leave?" If public higher education doesn't think that way and tries to be everything to everyone, then they shouldn't complain about the cost of tuition or low pay for employees.


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Online  Re: COVID-19 aftermath: What things will change forever?
Posted: May 10, 2020, 12:27 PM Post
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Have no fear the MBA's are winning everywhere. Unfortunately that has a tendency to lead to the opposite of delivering value to ones current 'market' and instead diverts attention and resources towards growing revenue. Over the years it has often reminded me of listening to second wave Moneyball believers who were oblivious to the fact that OBP was no longer undervalued. Too much business ideology assumes growth, or is biased towards growth. It runs into all kinds of trouble in education which needs to be run recognizing marginal growth is rarely an option.


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Online  Re: COVID-19 aftermath: What things will change forever?
Posted: May 10, 2020, 5:50 PM Post
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LouisEly said:
Outlander said:
The days of turning a blind eye to speeding during the pandemic appear to be gone. Speed traps everywhere the last few days, hadn't seen anybody pulled over prior to this since the middle of March.

Not in the Chicago area. Posted speed limit on the Edens is 55, I was doing 73 and people were blowing by me going 80+.


People drive like idiots in and around Chicago during normal non pandemic times.


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Offline  Re: COVID-19 aftermath: What things will change forever?
Posted: May 11, 2020, 9:54 AM Post
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LouisEly said:
SoCalBrewfan said:
But public higher education is not, and should not IMO be, a business. It's not about turning a profit or increasing revenues.

You're exactly right - it shouldn't be a business. But if they are going to provide a high quality education at reasonable tuition prices while competitively compensating their employees, maybe they need to think like a business.

The fundamental question that every business owner/CEO/executive asks themselves every day is, "How do we provide the highest quality product or service for our target market at the lowest operating cost while competitively compensating our employees so that they don't leave?" If public higher education doesn't think that way and tries to be everything to everyone, then they shouldn't complain about the cost of tuition or low pay for employees.


They did ask this question and they did it when business people started taking over the admin!

Target market: the richest possible students (or those with FAFSA money) who can increase our revenue. And build fancy facilities that will appeal to that demographic.
Highest quality product: Our paying customers don't like getting bad grades--inflate the grades and punish anyone who gives students a challenging class (which always generates lower survey ratings from students).
Lowest operating cost: Exploit cheap labor from graduate students and adjunct faculty.
Competitively compensating employees: that's how we ended up football coaches being the highest-paid public employee in most states.


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Online  Re: COVID-19 aftermath: What things will change forever?
Posted: May 11, 2020, 10:09 AM Post
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I seem to recall that UW, in particular, started letting in more out of state and foreign students and fewer in-state students in order to raise tuition revenue. Can't find if that's true or still the case though.

"Dustin Pedroia doesn't have the strength or bat speed to hit major-league pitching consistently, and he has no power......He probably has a future as a backup infielder if he can stop rolling over to third base and shortstop." Keith Law, 2006


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Offline  Re: COVID-19 aftermath: What things will change forever?
Posted: May 11, 2020, 11:05 AM Post
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homer said:
I seem to recall that UW, in particular, started letting in more out of state and foreign students and fewer in-state students in order to raise tuition revenue. Can't find if that's true or still the case though.


Yes, most state schools did that. As well as raising enrollment as fast as possible. And often revenue sent to individual departments was tied to class enrollment to incentivize the creation of more space for students. When my department realized this they started creating new elective classes with sexy titles to increase their revenue.

This wasn't necessarily bad strategy as students do need available classes to fulfill their credit obligations. And it helped make online courses a higher priority with better quality options. But it was just funny to see some of the unintended consequences. And the TAs/adjuncts who were responsible for all those extra students end up shouldering the burden.


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Offline  Re: COVID-19 aftermath: What things will change forever?
Posted: May 11, 2020, 1:15 PM Post
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homer said:
I seem to recall that UW, in particular, started letting in more out of state and foreign students and fewer in-state students in order to raise tuition revenue. Can't find if that's true or still the case though.

Yep:
https://registrar.wisc.edu/enrollment-reports/
Almost 50/50 for Fall 2019 freshmen (2734 residents) vs more than 2:1 in Fall 1991 freshmen (3605 residents).

owbc said:
As well as raising enrollment as fast as possible.

Not everywhere - UW-Madison had only 5% more total enrollment in the fall of 2019 (45,317) than the fall of 1991 (43,196).

When supply doesn't keep up with demand, prices rise. Why and how UW-Madison hasn't expanded their capacity, I don't know. But if state funding is being cut, like they have said, they may not be able to take on more students without raising tuition. State funding is a flat amount, not a per-student amount.


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Online  Re: COVID-19 aftermath: What things will change forever?
Posted: May 11, 2020, 2:45 PM Post
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Eventually though more students requires really expensive things like more dorm space more professors. It's the same thing in K-12, overhead doesn't meaningfully decline as a percentage of revenue after a certain point, so chasing revenue doesn't really help.


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Offline  Re: COVID-19 aftermath: What things will change forever?
Posted: May 13, 2020, 12:57 PM Post
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Deputy superintendent(or someone from DPI, cant remember), just said on the news that he expects the school year next year to look a lot different. Said either 100% online or a hybrid type of system. Also said he wasnt sure about after school activities. I for one, am not looking forward to teaching online again...especially with incoming second graders. My friend is concerned for his incoming kindergarten son learning to read. Again, I could not imagine not making those connections with students. At least young students.


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Offline  Re: COVID-19 aftermath: What things will change forever?
Posted: May 14, 2020, 9:24 AM Post
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Older students too. Many times the only reason they do anything is because of that relationship.


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Offline  Re: COVID-19 aftermath: What things will change forever?
Posted: May 14, 2020, 9:36 AM Post
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greeg35 said:
Older students too. Many times the only reason they do anything is because of that relationship.


True. I just mentioned younger studies as that is who I work with.


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Online  Re: COVID-19 aftermath: What things will change forever?
Posted: May 15, 2020, 6:22 AM Post
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I think I can stomach it if we can at least do some kind of hybrid in person/ online. All online to start the year though.. Makes me just want to stick my head and the sand and hope it all goes away.


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Online  Re: COVID-19 aftermath: What things will change forever?
Posted: May 15, 2020, 8:33 AM Post
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I just ordered a pair of shorts online.

I’ve purchased clothes online before, but have generally shied away from pants and shoes unless I was just buying another pair of something I already owned. I hate returning things.


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Offline  Re: COVID-19 aftermath: What things will change forever?
Posted: May 15, 2020, 9:47 AM Post
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The hammer is dropping big time in the UW System. I'm not sure if this has been in the news at all yet but staff at least one school I have ties to are being forced to take unpaid furloughs and there are major program cuts coming. Satellite schools have been given a directive to identify core strengths. Big changes are on the horizon.


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Offline  Re: COVID-19 aftermath: What things will change forever?
Posted: May 15, 2020, 7:14 PM Post
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LouisEly said:
One of the things I hope doesn't happen is environmental conservation efforts getting thrown out the window over irrational fears.

Grocery stores are now not allowing you to bring in reusable bags, and you either have to put the items back in your cart (good luck with that at the self-checkout kiosks) and take the cart to your car and pack them there or use the store's plastic bags which we have been continually reinforced over the years not to do.

One of the organizations in my industry is recommending that plates/dinnerware/utensils at facilities now be disposable. Can't have someone wearing gloves put them in the dishwasher.

Back to polluting the environment.


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Offline  Re: COVID-19 aftermath: What things will change forever?
Posted: May 15, 2020, 7:28 PM Post
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LouisEly said:
LouisEly said:
One of the things I hope doesn't happen is environmental conservation efforts getting thrown out the window over irrational fears.

Grocery stores are now not allowing you to bring in reusable bags, and you either have to put the items back in your cart (good luck with that at the self-checkout kiosks) and take the cart to your car and pack them there or use the store's plastic bags which we have been continually reinforced over the years not to do.

One of the organizations in my industry is recommending that plates/dinnerware/utensils at facilities now be disposable. Can't have someone wearing gloves put them in the dishwasher.

Back to polluting the environment.


Most of the big west coast cities have figured out curbside compost pickup and require disposable utensils to be compostable. Although with cities being broke using non-compostable plastic will probably be the result.

I do think this crisis has been a much-needed lesson for climate change mitigation. Crashing the economy is not the way to solve climate change, and even the huge reductions in commerce have done essentially nothing for reducing CO2 concentrations. Now would be a good time for a big investment in green energy on a global scale.


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