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COVID-19 aftermath: What things will change forever?

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Offline  Re: COVID-19 aftermath: What things will change forever?
Posted: June 19, 2020, 10:41 AM Post
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CheezWizHed said:
More on topic: My wife and I ate out last night for the first time in forever (way beyond COVID). The experience was a bit odd and made me wonder what we would've done if we didn't have a smart phone. The waitress drops down a "coaster" with a 2D bar code on it for the menu. Doesn't say anything about it. Evidently, I don't use those scanners often as my phone (~ 1 year old) didn't have one. I previously had the menu up on my phone (as we waited for a table), so I never bothered with it.

Then for the bill, I get a similar paper with a 2D code and she says you can pay on the phone and runs off. So, this time I downloaded the scanner and paid the bill.

Not to be all "conspiracy theorist", but I do wonder what companies will be taking advantage of COVID to further their tools/services where we will be forced into using something via legislation (purposely or inadvertently).


What kind of phone do you have? The default Google camera app automatically recognizes bar codes.


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Offline  Re: COVID-19 aftermath: What things will change forever?
Posted: June 19, 2020, 7:25 PM Post
Posts: 8302
thebruce44 said:
CheezWizHed said:
More on topic: My wife and I ate out last night for the first time in forever (way beyond COVID). The experience was a bit odd and made me wonder what we would've done if we didn't have a smart phone. The waitress drops down a "coaster" with a 2D bar code on it for the menu. Doesn't say anything about it. Evidently, I don't use those scanners often as my phone (~ 1 year old) didn't have one. I previously had the menu up on my phone (as we waited for a table), so I never bothered with it.

Then for the bill, I get a similar paper with a 2D code and she says you can pay on the phone and runs off. So, this time I downloaded the scanner and paid the bill.

Not to be all "conspiracy theorist", but I do wonder what companies will be taking advantage of COVID to further their tools/services where we will be forced into using something via legislation (purposely or inadvertently).


What kind of phone do you have? The default Google camera app automatically recognizes bar codes.


Same for iPhones.


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Offline  Re: COVID-19 aftermath: What things will change forever?
Posted: June 19, 2020, 7:30 PM Post
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nate82 said:
CheezWizHed said:
More on topic: My wife and I ate out last night for the first time in forever (way beyond COVID). The experience was a bit odd and made me wonder what we would've done if we didn't have a smart phone. The waitress drops down a "coaster" with a 2D bar code on it for the menu. Doesn't say anything about it. Evidently, I don't use those scanners often as my phone (~ 1 year old) didn't have one. I previously had the menu up on my phone (as we waited for a table), so I never bothered with it.

Then for the bill, I get a similar paper with a 2D code and she says you can pay on the phone and runs off. So, this time I downloaded the scanner and paid the bill.

Not to be all "conspiracy theorist", but I do wonder what companies will be taking advantage of COVID to further their tools/services where we will be forced into using something via legislation (purposely or inadvertently).


Paper and coins will be a thing of the past soon. The major banks have been pushing for this and with the blockchain now becoming more and more prevalent it shouldn't take all that long to move away from paper and coins.

FINTECH is a newish field in the financial industry. If you are looking for a job or want to make a career move take a FINTECH bootcamp as soon as possible.


Paper and coin made up 5% of the money supply when I was in college from '99-'03. I'm sure it's less than that now, especially with banks creating so much money. I'm still shocked I can't pay with Apple Pay everywhere. Been using it for seemingly 5 or so years. I have noticed a little greater adoption since COVID, though. But these tokenization tools like Apple Pay, Android Pay, and--I think--Samsung Pay are much more secure for businesses and consumers.


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Offline  Re: COVID-19 aftermath: What things will change forever?
Posted: June 19, 2020, 7:35 PM Post
Posts: 8302
homer said:
CheezWizHed said:
Yeah, but if your phone is your 2nd authentication and it has automatic logins to your bank and other passwords...

Just for the record, I don't keep bank nor CC info on my phone. But pay by phone starts pushing us that direction.


I don't believe CC# is stored on the phone. At least it's not with Google Pay (so they say).


Same with Apple Pay. The tokenization tech is extremely secure. I also love that every time my credit card is run, I get a simple push notification. I've caught two compromised credit cards due to Apple Pay notifications. Like I tell my students...by their early 20s, most will have had their identities compromised and credit/debit card info stolen. Why isn't someone messing with their finances yet? It's because the crooks have millions of cards and identities, and they just haven't gotten to them yet. Teens also are pretty shocked when I tell them how risky debit cards can be. They think of them as more secure than credit cards.


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Offline  Re: COVID-19 aftermath: What things will change forever?
Posted: June 20, 2020, 9:02 PM Post
Posts: 1873
I will be working hard to come up with ways to reduce our staffing by 50% for this Fall. With the amount of workers that are bowing out and the extreme lack of new applications, I don't have much of a choice. I am guessing these jobs will not be added in future years after I figure this out.


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Offline  Re: COVID-19 aftermath: What things will change forever?
Posted: June 21, 2020, 6:20 AM Post
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I can't see AMC theaters lasting. These last few days especially won't make me feel bad for them.


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Offline  Re: COVID-19 aftermath: What things will change forever?
Posted: June 21, 2020, 3:20 PM Post
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thebruce44 said:
CheezWizHed said:
More on topic: My wife and I ate out last night for the first time in forever (way beyond COVID). The experience was a bit odd and made me wonder what we would've done if we didn't have a smart phone. The waitress drops down a "coaster" with a 2D bar code on it for the menu. Doesn't say anything about it. Evidently, I don't use those scanners often as my phone (~ 1 year old) didn't have one. I previously had the menu up on my phone (as we waited for a table), so I never bothered with it.

Then for the bill, I get a similar paper with a 2D code and she says you can pay on the phone and runs off. So, this time I downloaded the scanner and paid the bill.

Not to be all "conspiracy theorist", but I do wonder what companies will be taking advantage of COVID to further their tools/services where we will be forced into using something via legislation (purposely or inadvertently).


What kind of phone do you have? The default Google camera app automatically recognizes bar codes.


Samsung Note 9. I later found an app for reading bar codes as it was integrated into the phone features (i.e. in the "menu bar" access and not with the traditional apps).


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Offline  Re: COVID-19 aftermath: What things will change forever?
Posted: July 01, 2020, 9:01 PM Post
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well, my district announced some form of virtual instruction beginning August 5th and running through at least Labor Day.


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Offline  Re: COVID-19 aftermath: What things will change forever?
Posted: July 01, 2020, 10:36 PM Post
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DHonks said:
well, my district announced some form of virtual instruction beginning August 5th and running through at least Labor Day.


One of my coworkers here in Phoenix said they were given the option of all online or 2-days in class and 3-days at home. What I found weird is the days they gave tue and wed or thur and fri which makes no sense to me. A schedule of Mon and Tue would make more sense especially for people working. Normally the people who can work from home Mon makes the most sense but also thur fri isn't also bad but tue wed is just mind boggling.


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Offline  Re: COVID-19 aftermath: What things will change forever?
Posted: July 02, 2020, 6:33 PM Post
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nate82 said:
DHonks said:
well, my district announced some form of virtual instruction beginning August 5th and running through at least Labor Day.


One of my coworkers here in Phoenix said they were given the option of all online or 2-days in class and 3-days at home. What I found weird is the days they gave tue and wed or thur and fri which makes no sense to me. A schedule of Mon and Tue would make more sense especially for people working. Normally the people who can work from home Mon makes the most sense but also thur fri isn't also bad but tue wed is just mind boggling.


I can rationalize lots of scenarios. The two first elementary districts to announce changes said they would have 1-day off each week for a deep clean (one on Wednesday, other district on Friday). Another district said they would be offering the option of 1-day in-person (3 at home) or 0 in-person (4 at home). It will be interesting to see how others make plans. And will there be sports?


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Offline  Re: COVID-19 aftermath: What things will change forever?
Posted: July 07, 2020, 1:54 PM Post
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Just had my annual checkup at the doctor. I'm wondering if masks will be permanent in clinics and hospitals now?


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Offline  Re: COVID-19 aftermath: What things will change forever?
Posted: July 08, 2020, 9:14 AM Post
Posts: 2302
Location: Madison, WI
DHonks said:
nate82 said:
DHonks said:
well, my district announced some form of virtual instruction beginning August 5th and running through at least Labor Day.


One of my coworkers here in Phoenix said they were given the option of all online or 2-days in class and 3-days at home. What I found weird is the days they gave tue and wed or thur and fri which makes no sense to me. A schedule of Mon and Tue would make more sense especially for people working. Normally the people who can work from home Mon makes the most sense but also thur fri isn't also bad but tue wed is just mind boggling.


I can rationalize lots of scenarios. The two first elementary districts to announce changes said they would have 1-day off each week for a deep clean (one on Wednesday, other district on Friday). Another district said they would be offering the option of 1-day in-person (3 at home) or 0 in-person (4 at home). It will be interesting to see how others make plans. And will there be sports?


Can't wait until the day when almost all of the teaching can be done "virtually." Should be able to eliminate a significant portion of teaching positions and free up funds to help other areas of government operate more efficiently. Educating the children, what a silly use of government money.


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Offline  Re: COVID-19 aftermath: What things will change forever?
Posted: July 08, 2020, 10:01 AM Post
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I do find it funny that there have been a few talking heads declaring schools need to open and there are risks all around us...yet they are working from home.


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Offline  Re: COVID-19 aftermath: What things will change forever?
Posted: July 08, 2020, 10:05 AM Post
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CheezWizHed said:
Just had my annual checkup at the doctor. I'm wondering if masks will be permanent in clinics and hospitals now?



Possibly. I personally hate wearing a mask, but will wear one of I'm told to do so. I'm also getting more comfortable wearing one without being asked.

It is interesting to look at the numbers of countries that went to masks right away compared to those that haven't. A lot of those countries use masks more often typically though, so maybe if we get used to using masks more often it wont be a big deal the next time something like this comes through.


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Offline  Re: COVID-19 aftermath: What things will change forever?
Posted: July 08, 2020, 1:13 PM Post
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JosephC said:

Can't wait until the day when almost all of the teaching can be done "virtually." Should be able to eliminate a significant portion of teaching positions and free up funds to help other areas of government operate more efficiently. Educating the children, what a silly use of government money.


I know you are referring to K-12, but I'm hoping that colleges will embrace this approach more in the future. Approximately 1/3rd of the expense of college is room and board. Even cutting back that $32-48k (for four years) total back to $20-30k is a big improvement on college costs.


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Offline  Re: COVID-19 aftermath: What things will change forever?
Posted: July 08, 2020, 1:21 PM Post
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I will have to look up the study that was done on school spending and where it goes again if I can find it again that is. But it stated the majority of the funding goes to administration than it does to buildings, technology, supplies, activities and teacher salaries.


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Offline  Re: COVID-19 aftermath: What things will change forever?
Posted: July 10, 2020, 9:55 PM Post
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nate82 said:
I will have to look up the study that was done on school spending and where it goes again if I can find it again that is. But it stated the majority of the funding goes to administration than it does to buildings, technology, supplies, activities and teacher salaries.


For k-12, Administration makes up about 10% (lower in my district). I can't find the exact number, but I've heard teacher salaries make up something like 60% of the budget

Edit: found the Admin percent


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Offline  Re: COVID-19 aftermath: What things will change forever?
Posted: July 11, 2020, 9:41 AM Post
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So, my wife and I (mostly my wife) homeschooled our kids for most of their lives and have gone into a traditional school for high school. So, going back to "school from home" was pretty natural for my kids and we had zero problems with them getting work done. Yes, they continued through new topics and finished their normal curriculum.

I say that for the background to my question. I don't really want to go down the homeschool vs. traditional comparison. For many people and many reasons, homeschooling isn't an option.

So what if some classes were taught virtually? Or even entire grades? There has been a lot of discussion about the lack of quality teachers. Could virtual teachers help solve that problem? Yes, that would probably mean fewer teachers as JosephC commented (though in blue), though I doubt it would really effect the numbers much. For certain classes, especially the advanced classes (math, physics, chemistry, etc..), that might help schools in rural areas or inner cities attract better teachers.

Here in Minnesota, PSEO is pretty popular because it is funded by the state government. My kids take classes from a MN university and get both high school and college credit (if it transfers to your college of choice). My daughter attended her physical classroom, but for certain hours, worked on her PSEO online. As she goes into college this fall, we are hoping she has reduced her tuition by one semester (~$12k savings).

Perhaps if virtual classrooms were extended, it would provide school districts with more options for a good education, even if they are short on qualified teachers. When I was a senior in HS, our advanced math and physics teacher had a baby and was out for 6 weeks. Living in rural WI, we had no option for a qualified substitute to take all of her classes. In fact, the person that replaced her was so bad, I ended up coaching her on algebra so she could teach that class (I even attended that class to help the students directly a couple of times). The rest of us (Trig, Geometry, Algebra II, Physics) were on our own for 6 weeks of "self-study". A virtual teacher would've been wonderful.

I realize that many kids are going to have issues with self-motivation if they were at home all the time doing school. But perhaps some are in the classroom with a classroom monitor.


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Offline  Re: COVID-19 aftermath: What things will change forever?
Posted: July 11, 2020, 9:51 AM Post
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The rest of us (Trig, Geometry, Algebra II, Physics) were on our own for 6 weeks of "self-study".

By the way, our regular teacher was so good, that my classes (Trig/Pre-Calc and Physics) caught up by the end of the year. My first classes in college Calculus and Physics were 100% review for me. So Hooray for good teachers! [smile]


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Offline  Re: COVID-19 aftermath: What things will change forever?
Posted: July 17, 2020, 3:54 PM Post
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The average spending for schools is something around $13,000 per student some sources have it as high as $16,000 per student but I will go with the old 2017 information where it was at $13,000 per student other sources are not all that reliable for the $16,000 figure.

So instead of the government spending this money maybe they should just give it to the parents as a stipend to pay for the schooling that they want. If they want their kids to attend a private school they can use it for that. A better idea would be to pool your money together and hire a teacher which for a teacher would actually be more lucrative for them. For example lets say 10 families with 1 child each decide to pool their money together and hire a teacher that teacher now has a salary of $130,000 instead of the average of about $40,000 I believe it is.

You could also change the tax code so that some of that salary would go to expenses and be written off. Unions could also create a co-op where their members could pool in their money using it how they see fit maybe the salaries for each individual teacher goes down but they can join a pool of workers and get health insurance and a retirement plan that is managed. I believe this would be a win for the students, teachers, parents and education in general. The teachers could get their smaller class sizes which with social distancing if it is still a thing in the future will help.

But this makes way too much sense so I doubt it would even get pass the mentioning here to any form of government.


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