LambeauLeap1250 WSSP


Test
  
Go to page 1, 2  Next  [ 40 posts ]  New Topic   Add Reply

2019 Official Draft Pick Selection/Signing Thread

Author Message
Offline    2019 Official Draft Pick Selection/Signing Thread
#1

Posted: June 03, 2019, 8:30 AM Post
User avatar

Resident Hipster
Global Moderator
Posts: 12394
This thread will be used to post all draft picks in order of their selection, as well as page-by-page details of the picks, which we will slowly but surely add to in the coming days.

A moderator will update the picks and player profiles. If you have comments/links about a player, please post them in the appropriate discussion thread.

Bold indicates the player has signed.

1 (28). Ethan Small, LHP, Mississippi State
2 (65). Antoine Kelly, LHP, Wabash Valley JC (IL)
4 (133). Nick Kahle, C, Washington
5 (163). Thomas Dillard, C, Ole Miss
6 (193). Nick Bennett, LHP, Louisville
7 (223). Gabe Holt, CF, Texas Tech
8 (253). David Hamilton, SS, Texas
9 (283). Darrien Miller, C, Clovis HS (CA)
10 (313). Taylor Floyd, RHP, Texas Tech
11 (343). Brock Begue, LHP, Cuyahoga CC (OH)
12 (373). Arman Sabouri, LHP, California
13 (403). Jackson Gillis, LHP, Vanderbilt
14 (433). Paxton Schultz, RHP, Utah Valley
15 (463). Cam Devanney, SS, Elon University
16 (493). Mike Wilson, CF, SUNY Stony Brook (NY)
17 (523). Kelvin Bender, LHP, Junipero Serra HS (CA)
18 (553). Ashton McGee, 2B, North Carolina
19 (583). Bryce Milligan, RHP, Oklahoma City University
20 (613). Myles Austin, SS, Westlake HS (GA) WILL NOT SIGN
21 (643). Eddy Tavarez, RHP, Peru St College
22 (673). Terence Doston, CF, Hillsborough HS (FL)
23 (703). Carter Rustad, RHP, Staley HS (MO) WILL NOT SIGN
24 (733). Jose Torres, SS, Calvert Hall College HS (MD) WILL NOT SIGN
25 (763). Dan Wirchansky, LHP, Pace University WILL NOT SIGN
26 (793). Zach Humphreys, C, TCU WILL NOT SIGN
27 (823). Zane Zurbrugg, CF, Shoreline CC (WA)
28 (853). Andre Nnebe, CF, Santa Clara University
29 (883). Jackie Urbaez, 2B, St. Thomas University
30 (913). Peyton Long, RHP, Central Methodist University
31 (943). Jonathan Jones, RHP, San Jacinto College North (TX) WILL NOT SIGN
32 (973). Jeff Figueroa, RHP, Florida Virtual School (FL)
33 (1003). Kevin Hardin, 1B, Maplewoods CC (MO)
34 (1033). Josh Shapiro, LHP, Marshall
35 (1063). Odrick Pitre, SS, Alvin CC (TX)
36 (1093). Keegan McCarville, RHP, Santa Clara University
37 (1123). Abimael Gonzalez, CF, Leadership Christian Academy (PR)
38 (1153). Eli Nabholz, RHP, Millersville University
39 (1183). Harrison Beethe, RHP, North Iowa Area CC WILL NOT SIGN
40 (1213). Tyler Keysor, RHP, Miami WILL NOT SIGN


 Top
 
Offline  Re: 2019 Official Draft Pick Selection/Signing Thread
#2

Posted: June 03, 2019, 8:33 AM Post
User avatar

Resident Hipster
Global Moderator
Posts: 12394
ROUND 1 (28th overall): Ethan Small, LHP

Image
(Photo: Keith Warren)

Height: 6'3
Weight: 214
B/T: L/L
School: Mississippi State
Year: Junior (Redshirt)
DOB: 2/14/97

SCOUTING REPORT:

MLB Pipeline:
Scouting grades: Fastball: 55 | Curveball: 50 | Changeup: 55 | Control: 50 | Overall: 50

Small reached 96 mph with his fastball as a freshman reliever at Mississippi State in 2016, but he also had trouble finding the strike zone and logged a 13.06 ERA. He blew out his elbow that summer and had Tommy John surgery, sidelining him for all of 2017. He has been a totally different pitcher since he returned and could sneak into the first round this June after turning down the D-backs as a 26th-rounder last year as a redshirt sophomore. The Southeastern Conference pitcher of the year, he entered the NCAA tournament ranked second in strikeouts (150), hit rate (4.8 per nine innings) and WHIP (0.80).

While many pitchers see their velocity increase after they complete the grueling rehab process after having their elbow reconstructed, Small doesn't throw as hard as he did in the past but is much more effective. His fastball ranges from 86-92 mph yet generates a lot of swings and misses and weak contact. He creates plane with his 6-foot-3 frame and high-three-quarters arm slot and deception with some crossfire and by varying the tempo of his delivery.

Small also demonstrates significantly better feel for his changeup than he had before he got hurt, selling it with fastball arm speed and getting some fade on the mid-70s offering. He has a curveball with similar velocity and good depth, though he rarely uses it in games because he hasn't needed to. His control and command also are much improved since his Tommy John surgery, giving him a high floor and a chance to be a No. 4 starter.

Perfect Game:
Quickly taking the reigns as the Mississippi State ace this season, Small has enjoyed a fantastic season for the Bulldogs as the Bulldogs eye a return trip to Omaha. Through the end of the regular season, Small sits at 8-1 with a 1.84 ERA across 83 innings. He’s allowed just 45 hits and 22 walks (0.81 WHIP) while racking up 139 strikeouts, good for an eye-popping 15.07 K/9. His size, athleticism and stuff all check boxes for scouts in big ways, and he’s done an excellent job pitching himself up and up draft boards this spring. It’s well within reason that he’s selected higher than this ranking come early June as college pitchers with stuff and performance usually don’t wait around long to hear their names called, especially when they throw with their left hand and dominate the SEC.

Perfect Game (3/1/19 Game Report):
Entering the Frisco College Classic, Ethan Small (six-foot-three and 214-pounds) had posted video game-like numbers through two starts in 2019. With 24 strikeouts without issuing a walk and allowing four hits over the span of 12 innings of work, it is hard to decide which stat is more impressive. Against Sam Houston State, Small wasn’t quite as dominant but he was still certainly impressive. Sporting a fastball that reached as high as 92 mph, he effectively added and subtracted from the velocity of the offering for the better part of six innings on the mound. Although he allowed more hits in this start than he had allowed on the entire season, Small was effectively in control of his repertoire for most of the outing.

Using varying tempos of the windup, he established the ability to “quick pitch” as well as create deception with a longer pause at the top of his leg lift in the early innings. After showing multiple versions of his windup over the first couple of innings, it appeared that Small was content with the idea that he had the hitters thinking about what might be coming instead of focusing on what actually was be offered.

After the second inning he abandoned the deceptive tactics of the delivery and established solid command of his fastball in and out and mostly down in the zone, with life and plane. He effectively commanded a fading changeup between 74-78 mph to add some length to his fastball. More than a handful of Bearkat hitters was seen slamming their bat after a few strides down the line on pitches that just missed the barrel of their bats.

Showing functional strength in his delivery, Small effectively overcomes a slight crossfire step, effectively reaching both sides of the plate with his fastball and shows a real feel for the fastball-changeup combination. He will throw a curveball that shows 1-to-7 shape and is consistently 76-77 mph, but only seldomly. The curveball is clearly his third pitch presently.

Small is a good athlete with a loose arm that can control the running game and effectively field his position. He has supreme confidence is his stuff and in the pitches that are called for him. He will prove to be a tough out for any opponent, no matter where he pitches in the rotation for Mississippi State, because he will not beat himself. If his outing, against a very solid Sam Houston State offense, is classified as a rough outing by his standards – allowing two earned runs in six innings without issuing a walk – then Small will be in consideration for some very lofty honors this season.

2080 Baseball:
Background: A redshirt junior, Small was popped in the 26th Round of the 2018 MLB Draft last June by the Diamondbacks, but opted to return to Starkville for another year. That decision appears to have paid off, as the lefty has dazzled to the tune of a 9-2 record with a 1.88 ERA and a whopping 160 strikeouts in 96 innings of work. Opposing hitters have mustered just a .160 average against the southpaw over 371 plate appearances.

Notes: A Tommy John recipient as an underclassman, Small has bounced back with slightly softer stuff than he showed earlier in his career, but significantly better consistency and command. He works anywhere from 88-to-93 mph with his fastball, changing speeds and peppering all four quadrants to effectively keep hitters off balance and unable to sit on a particular swing zone. There’s lots to like about the pitch path, as he comes with good angle to the plate and a high release that gets downhill easily. His fastball path doesn’t leave tons of room for swing-plane overlap and results in lots of empty swings and soft contact despite its average velocity. His changeup is a plus weapon, playing out of the same slot with arm speed deception and fade, while his curve serves as a quality change-of-pace weapon against same side bats and a strike-stealer when dropped in the zone early in counts. Small grades out well on the college analytics side thanks to his ability to pound the zone and avoid hard contact while missing lots of bats. He’s a first round quality producer that gets dinged slightly for his “advanced age” and the profile qualifies as a relatively safe bet to be a productive big league arm in some capacity. He projects well as a future #4 starter.

Baseball America:
Small’s 2019 season was an excellent demonstration of how a pitcher can dramatically improve his draft stock by simply excelling week after week. When the season began, Small was seen as a potential fourth- to fifth-round pick as a durable and successful Southeastern Conference Friday starter with average stuff. The assessment of his pure stuff hasn’t changed all that much, but his control and command has ticked up and no one can deny the extremely impressive results. Small was second in Division I in strikeout rate (15 K/9) as of early May. A 26th-round pick of the D-Backs last year as a redshirt sophomore, Small has bounced back well from the Tommy John surgery that forced him to miss the entire 2017 season. This season, opposing hitters have struggled to see and connect with his 89-92 mph fastball. Velocity-wise, the pitch average at best. But his delivery hides the ball well, and because of its movement and deception, it earns above-average grades from some scouts. Small’s delivery is long in the back, but he repeats it consistently. Much like Mariners’ lefthander Yusei Kikuchi, Small will vary the amount of time he hangs on the rubber before exploding toward home plate, which also messes with hitters’ timing. At times, Small can dominate college hitters pitching primarily off his fastball simply because he has plus command and plus control. Small fills the zone consistently, and he mixes in an average sluvy curveball as well. Small’s changeup was a better pitch in 2018 than it has been in 2019, when it’s been a fringe-average offering in most outings. There is reason to believe it can improve, however, since he’s shown more conviction and feel for the pitch in the past. Small doesn’t have a true plus pitch and projects as a No. 5 starter, but his command, control and consistency will likely push him into the second or third round.

Fangraphs:
Small was eligible last year but made a jump this year to justify going in the top 5 rounds. He has average stuff, above average feel, sits around 90 and has 70 deception. One scout mentioned Ryan Yarbrough as a comparable pitcher, though Small is more of an four-seam, up in the zone type.

Jeff Ellis:
Small has been anything but that on his way to a likely SEC pitcher of the year. The lefty has a strikeout per nine over 15 with a walks per nine barely over two. He has been a force of nature all year and that is after racking up 101 innings last year over 18 starts. No one is able to get on base against him with any regularity. The utter domination of the SEC and college players, in general, push up Small for me, who is much lower on a lot of boards. He is a redshirt junior who was drafted a year ago by the Diamondbacks in the 26th round. This is due to the fact that he missed all of 2017 after Tommy John surgery. He went from being an erratic reliever as a freshman in 2016 to a control specialist who still missed a lot of bats and then took another quantum leap this year in performance. Small reminds me of Zac Lowther a few years ago, as both were lefties who thrived on command, control, and deception while striking out huge numbers of batters. Lowther went in the comp B round to the Orioles, and now would be a slam dunk top 20 pick, due to his performance in the minors, if we redraft the 2017 draft. Small’s high level of production and performance just can’t be looked past. He is a safe left-handed pitcher who should move quickly to the majors and be able to eat innings for a lot of years to come.

Keith Law:
A redshirt junior who missed a year due to Tommy John surgery, Small hasn't regained his pre-surgery velocity but has improved substantially as a pitcher, with a better breaking ball and better control, striking out 44 percent of the batters he's faced this season.

Prospects Live:
Small doesn’t have huge velocity or a knockout secondary. His fastball has tons of life at the top of the zone, though, and he’s striking out over 15 per nine in the nation’s best conference. An analytically-inclined organization should be all over Small at the end of Day One.

LINKS:


VIDEOS:





 Top
 
Offline  Re: 2019 Official Draft Pick Selection/Signing Thread
#3

Posted: June 03, 2019, 8:34 AM Post
User avatar

Resident Hipster
Global Moderator
Posts: 12394
ROUND 2 (65th overall): Antoine Kelly, LHP

Image
(Photo: Twitter)

Height: 6'6
Weight: 205
B/T: L/L
School: Wabash Valley JC (IL)
Year: Freshman
DOB: 12/5/99

SCOUTING REPORT:

MLB Pipeline:
Scouting grades: Fastball: 70 | Slider: 45 | Changeup: 40 | Control: 45 | Overall: 45

Kelly was a late popup before the 2018 Draft as an Illinois high schooler, impressing scouts enough with his size and projectability that the Padres made a run at signing him to an over-slot bonus in the 13th round. He chose instead to attend Wabash Valley (Ill.) CC, where he led national juco pitchers with 19.1 strikeouts per nine innings. He may have the biggest gap between his ceiling and floor of any player in the Draft.

His fastball topped out in the low 90s as a high school senior, but after adding 20 pounds and cleaning up his delivery, Kelly is reaching 98 mph and showing the ability to work at 94-97 mph for innings at a time. Scouts look at his 6-foot-6 frame and how easy and loose his arm looks while pumping mid-90s heat, and many of them come up with same physical comparison: a young David Price. He still has room to add more strength and to further improve his mechanics, so it's easy to project him topping 100 mph in the future.

Kelly lacks a usable second pitch because he hasn't shown much aptitude for spinning the ball -- his mid-80s slider is below average -- and his changeup is non-existent. His control also needs a major upgrade and his mound presence concerns scouts as well. His development will require a ton of patience and he ultimately may be more of a reliever than a starter, but he has a rare arm.

Perfect Game:
One of the more intriguing helium guys of late in the 2018 cycle, Kelly jumped onto radars as a long, lengthy lefty with tremendous arm speed, though every facet of his game was very raw. After choosing not to sign with the Padres last summer, Kelly reported to Wabash Valley Junior College, the No. 1 JUCO team in the nation all season, where he has continued his ascent up draft boards. Kelly is still incredibly raw on the mound and has a very long ways to go to reach his prodigious ceiling, but he’s a 6-foot-6 lefthander with long limbs, plus-plus arm speed, and a fastball that already touches 97-98 mph with a low effort delivery. He still can struggle to consistently spin a breaking ball and his changeup, while showing promise at times, is still nascent. Though, when scouts whisper in hushed tones about how similar he is to what Aroldis Chapman looked like many years ago, it’s easy to see why he’s viewed so highly. Kelly is a bit of a boom-or-bust prospect at this point, but his pure upside outstrips that of 99 percent of the other prospects eligible this year and that’s why it’s unlikely he’ll have to wait long to hear his named called during the draft.

2080 Baseball:
Kelly is a huge upside arm with tons of projection and a lot of developmental work ahead of him. With a medium broad 6-foot-6, 215-pound frame, the lefty has room to hang a good amount of additional strength as he matures and is already sturdy to the eye. The fastball sits at an easy 94-to-96 mph, touching higher, and it comes with minimal effort. The slider and changeup are both in their nascent stages and will require a good deal of developmental work at the next level. Kelly’s probably a little too raw to come off the board before the second round, but given the number of teams with multiple picks to spend it wouldn’t be shocking. He’s going to be sitting in the upper 90s, touching triple digits in the near future.

Baseball America:
Intrigued by his easy velocity, the Padres made a serious effort to sign Kelly as a 13th-round pick out of high school. He opted instead to head to Wabash Valley (Ill.) JC, which appears to be a wise move, as he’s more highly regarded a year later. It wouldn’t be a surprise if Kelly touched 100 mph at some point. Already, he sits at 93-95 and touches 97 from the left side with extremely easy arm action. He also optimistically has the makings of a future above-average slider. Athletic teenage lefties with this kind of stuff often hear their name called relatively quickly in the draft, especially when they strike out 19.1 batters per nine innings. Kelly does throw across his body and struggles at times to find the strike zone, but the fastball-slider combo is going to be hard for teams to ignore.

Prep Baseball Report:
At 6-foot-5, 210 pounds Kelly physically resembles David Price. On this look he showed erratic command of a 92-97 mph FB, a seldom used slider at 80-86 and raw pitchability. However, there isn't another college lefty in this year's draft class who combines his body type, arm strength and the ease in which he does it. He was out of sync with a lower half rush and upper body arm drag causing command struggles throughout his two-plus inning start. Including the seven walks from this most recent outing, Kelly has walked 21 and struckout 63 in 31.1 IP this spring. He's shown improvement in his eight months at Wabash Valley with his FB gaining velocity from exposure to a consistent throwing program and training routine. He works very slow and tries to keep the game slow. He would benefit by adopting a more aggressive and confident body language. At this point, he is a polarizing prospect within the scouting industry; scouts either really like him, or they don't much at all. Some recognize the hard-to-find talent of a long, loose bodied lefty with premium arm strength. Others see the high risk and lack of pitchability, with most likely a slow track through a MLB player development system. Regardless, Kelly will have plenty of interest from clubs who aren't afraid to gamble on young, high ceiling arms that they can develop over the long term. Texas, and to some extent Toronto and San Diego, have shown this tendency in the past.

Fangraphs:
Kelly was a Padres draftee last year and his velo spike this spring, hitting 97. He's an atheltic 6'5 along the lines of Amir Garrett or Taylor Hearn.

LINKS:
WEHT 7 (ABC affiliate) - WVC's Antoine Kelly Jr. "wowing" MLB scouts (Direct Video Link)

Wabash Valley flamethrowing sensation Kelly ready for whatever comes in MLB Draft

VIDEOS:

Before and after





 Top
 
Offline  Re: 2019 Official Draft Pick Selection/Signing Thread
#4

Posted: June 04, 2019, 12:33 PM Post
User avatar

Resident Hipster
Global Moderator
Posts: 12394
ROUND 4 (133rd overall): Nick Kahle, C

Image
(Photo: Washington University)

Height: 5'10
Weight: 210
B/T: R/R
School: Washington
Year: Junior
DOB: 2/28/98

SCOUTING REPORT:

MLB Pipeline:
Scouting grades: Hit: 50 | Power: 40 | Run: 35 | Arm: 50 | Field: 50 | Overall: 45

When Kahle first got to the University of Washington after playing his high school ball in Southern California in 2017, he got to learn under the wing of Joey Morgan, who ended up being a third-round pick of the Tigers that June. Kahle's been the starter since, and while he might not surpass his predecessor in terms of when he gets taken, he's had a tremendous junior season to raise his stock.

Kahle has been hitting with a lot of confidence all spring, giving scouts hope he'll hit for average at the next level. He's shown the ability to catch up to good fastballs with solid bat speed and recognizes breaking stuff well, which he's gotten a lot of as teams have pitched around him. He tends to show mostly gap power, but he does stay inside the ball well and shows some ability to turn on pitches for some home run power. Short and stocky, Kahle is a below-average runner and doesn't have that much agility behind the plate. He has improved his receiving and blocks well, and while his arm is fringy strength-wise, it's accurate.

Teams thinking about taking Kahle early will be buying the bat and believing it will play as a pro. If it does, he has the chance to play a long time, with a floor as a very good backup and the chance to be a solid regular if everything clicks.

Perfect Game:
Kahle is going to be one of the darlings of the performance group of players, especially when you look at his walk totals. He has a 59:26 BB:K ratio in 2019, to go along with an overall triple slash of .337/.511/.529 with seven doubles and eight home runs. A compactly-built, physically strong backstop, Kahle has a solid collection of average tools to go along with that tremendous eye at the plate and some hidden raw power as well.

Perfect Game (2/19/19 Game Report):
Washington has done a nice job in recent years developing backstops for the next level and Nick Kahle should help continue that trend. Coming off of a strong sophomore season, Kahle is an undersized grinder and leader that has done a nice job handling UW’s pitching staff. He didn’t get tested behind the plate by opposing baserunners but showed average arm strength in between innings.

At the plate as a righthanded hitter Kahle takes big boy hacks, looking to do damage and ran into one during game action for a home run. He employs a wide base and a leg ick helping him get into his lower half and drive the ball with a clear intent to elevate the baseball.

Baseball America:
Kahle is a short, 5-foot-10, 195-pound catcher who has shown excellent feel to hit in a career-best junior season. Through his first 50 games, Kahle was hitting .337/.511/.528 with terrific plate discipline. His 59 walks through that stretch were good enough for the sixth-best walk total in the country among Division I hitters, and his 1.18 walks per game trailed only Oregon State catcher Adley Rutschman. Scouts praise his approach and note that he rarely chases balls out of the zone. He swings with a short, direct path to the plate that generates some loft, but he has mostly doubles power right now. Kahle is known as a smart player who works well with pitchers. There are mixed reviews about his defense behind the plate. Some scouts see him as a polished receiver with good blocking ability and solid arm strength, while others think his arm is below-average and wonder how well his frame will hold up in the future.

Prep Baseball Report:
Stocky build with strength throughout his frame at 5-foot-10, 210 pounds. Moves better than you might initially anticipate. He’s not a stiff athlete by any means. Has the actions and skills to be a quality defensive catcher at the next level. Doesn’t possess any above average, standout tools but does everything well and has been a consistent performer all spring. Didn’t see him show off his arm strength during I/O and ASU didn’t attempt to steal any bags on the 2 games we saw. Popped a 2.15 in-between innings but never felt like he was truly cutting it loose at game speed. Polished receiver with a reliable glove hand. Has the agility to get out of his stance and make plays in front of the plate. Offensively he has a relaxed and open set-up in the box. Keeps hands tight to his body and never loses control of the barrel. Stride foot lands soft and he stays in an athletic hitting position throughout. Has a knack for generating consistent contact. There’s an uphill path to his swing as he finishes. While he flashed some raw power in BP, he seems best suited as a contact hitter who uses all fields. Maintains a highly advanced approach with impressive on-base skills. As of May 1st, has an OBP of .519 thru 39 games, good for 6th nationally in all of D1 baseball. He’s also currently sporting a ridiculous 43:17 walk-to-strikeout-ratio. Kahle is a throwback type of player who brings tremendous value to the offensive and defensive side of the ball.

Fangraphs:
Kahle has great peripherals at the plate but is more of a catch-and-throw type.


LINKS:


VIDEOS:





 Top
 
Offline  Re: 2019 Official Draft Pick Selection/Signing Thread
#5

Posted: June 04, 2019, 12:33 PM Post
User avatar

Resident Hipster
Global Moderator
Posts: 12394
ROUND 5 (163rd overall): Thomas Dillard, C

Image
(Photo: Twitter)

Height: 6'0
Weight: 235
B/T: S/R
School: Ole Miss
Year: Junior
DOB: 8/28/97

SCOUTING REPORT:

MLB Pipeline:
Scouting grades: Hit: 45 | Power: 55 | Run: 40 | Arm: 50 | Field: 40 | Overall: 45

Dillard led all national high school players with 16 homers as a senior in 2016 -- finishing one ahead of Kyle Muller, who signed with the Braves for $2.5 million as a pitcher. He went undrafted because he was strongly committed to Mississippi and lacked an obvious position. Three years later scouts still aren't sure where he fits best, but he's a switch-hitter who has hit for power in the Southeastern Conference and draws some "poor man's Kyle Schwarber" comparisons.

Dillard generates impressive raw pop with a combination of bat speed, strength and loft in his swing. He has improved his plate discipline and contact rate throughout his college career and has a chance to hit for average as well. Though he has below-average speed, he's aggressive on the bases and has good feel for picking spots to steal.

Dillard has played mostly left field at Mississippi, showing at least average arm strength but limited range. The hope is that he can become an adequate defender in left, but he could wind up at first base or DH. He was a catcher in high school and has seen brief action behind the plate for the Rebels, though the consensus is that he doesn't receive well enough to do so in pro ball.

Perfect Game:
Dillard has been a mainstay in the Rebels’ lineup since he got to campus in Oxford, and he has a pretty polished hit tool from both sides of the plate. There’s good raw power and a real chance to hit consistently at the next level. Unfortunately for Dillard the rest of his profile is limited as the physical switch-hitter doesn’t offer much in terms of speed or defensive value, but if he continues to hit and drive in runs that won’t matter as much.

Perfect Game (4/26/19 Game Report):
Slugging Ole Miss outfielder Thomas Dillard might be one of the biggest risers this year in terms of draft status as he hasn't been able to stop hitting and has entrenched himself in the day one conversation for this year's MLB draft. Dillard is a switch-hitting corner outfielder with plus raw power and has been on a monster tear through the early part of the season.

Dillard is built like a bowling ball with a 6-foot, 230-pound frame that looks like he hits leg day very hard with immense lower half strength. There isn't a whole lot to project on the frame as he's already incredibly strong and gets to his power a lot in games. The question for Dillard at the next level will be where his ultimate position home lies. He's listed as a catcher but mans left field for Ole Miss and while he does an adequate job there first base could be in his future as he doesn't look the most comfortable in the outfield grass and is a below average runner.

The main value of Dillard's profile is going to come from the offensive game and it is loud. Dillard hits from a very wide stance with good balance throughout from both sides. He's a bit shorter to the ball from the right side and has more natural loft, and length, from the left side. This allows Dillard's power to play more naturally from the left side but he also gets his fair share from the right side from virtue of his ability to impact the baseball hard at the point of contact.

The power doesn't just play to the pull side, he can create hard-hit contact to any part of the diamond. He uses all fields but really likes pulling the ball and gets his hands in a good position to launch. Dillard has an OPS over 1.000 this season and has really improved his plate discipline too, walking 39 times compared to just 25 strikeouts on the season. If he keeps hitting and hitting the ball hard, Dillard offers significant value as a bat-first prospect to a team at the next level.

2080 Baseball:
A switch hitter, Dillard is a little more fluid from the left side but shows above average power from either side. While he’s more power than hit, he’s made strides with the bat. He has feel for the strike zone, and has successfully cut down on his strikeouts each season. He saw limited action behind the dish for the Rebels, but his future defensive home is likely in left field or at first base.

Baseball America:
Dillard has well above-average raw power, putting on impressive batting practice displays, and he’s a switch-hitter who is especially impressive when hitting lefthanded. Dillard has a compact build and a swing that is short and direct to the ball. He was Ole Miss’ best hitter as a sophomore—leading the team with 13 home runs as well as posting a team-best .439 on-base percentage and .563 slugging percentage. He’s been similarly productive as a junior, although his power largely disappeared in Southeastern Conference games. Dillard projects as an average hitter with a solid batting eye and above-average power potential. He has also been surprisingly productive on the basepaths despite fringe-average speed. He’s swiped 32 bags in 37 attempts the past two years. The question with Dillard is where he will play defensively. He’s primarily been a left fielder for Ole Miss, but this year he did catch a few midweek games for the Rebels. In left field, he’s a fringe-average defender. Scouts see him as a fill-in catcher, at best, in pro ball, with currently well-below-average defense. However, they do note that he hasn’t had much of a chance to focus on catching in college, as he’s played on the same team with Cooper Johnson—one of the best defensive catchers in college baseball.

Prep Baseball Report:
The former switch hitting high school catcher hit out of the lead off spot for the Rebels. The physical build obviously jumps out but he’s not just a hitter with enormous pop. His swing is compact with no wasted action but shows nice top hand strength though the zone. Toes were on the inner chalk as he showed no trouble getting to anything on the inner half, doubling on a FB in and also had a single (both to the pull side). Love the set up with the elbows in tight against the body creating that short barrel path. Showed nice discipline by routinely laying off of breaking balls down in the dirt and really has an understanding of the hitting zone. The bat path obviously has some tilt in it. Although the form may not be picturesque, he can run especially for a guy of his stature. Arm strength is average from LF but the bat plays. ML role as bench bat/4th OFer with potential based on his past days to serve as a 3rd/emergency catcher. Top 5 round potential.

Fangraphs:
Dillard has huge raw power but a maxed-out frame that will limit him to first base.

Jeff Ellis:
Dillard was a prep catcher who has spent some time at catcher, outfield, and first base for Ole Miss. He performed very well for the first half of the year, hitting for power and looking like the player who led the country in home runs as a senior in high school. Then SEC play began and Dillard turned into an average bat. He hit just two home runs over 30 games and his average, on base, and slugging were all down. Before conference play, he looked like a second rounder, now he is more in the fourth or fifth round range. Dillard has no position at this point. His value is all tied to his bat. His near 20 percent walk rate was his best offensive performance for a player who saw his numbers down across the board. A down year plus lack of position could make him a candidate to end up back at Ole Miss.


LINKS:


VIDEOS:





 Top
 
Offline  Re: 2019 Official Draft Pick Selection/Signing Thread
#6

Posted: June 04, 2019, 12:33 PM Post
User avatar

Resident Hipster
Global Moderator
Posts: 12394
ROUND 6 (193rd overall): Nick Bennett, LHP

Image
(Photo: Steven Branscombe)

Height: 6'3
Weight: 200
B/T: L/L
School: Louisville
Year: Junior
DOB: 9/1/97

SCOUTING REPORT:

MLB Pipeline:
Bennett’s pitchability likely outpaces his stuff, as his heater hovers in the high 80s -- occasionally touching 93 mph -- and his curveball and changeup each rate as average at best. But the southpaw competes, showing an ability to throw for strikes and limit walks for Louisville.

Perfect Game:
Bennett hasn’t had the year he was likely looking for, struggling to a 6-3, 4.86 record in 12 starts and 63 innings after going 13-3, 3.02 over his first two seasons as a starter for the Cardinals. At his best, Bennett has a solid three-pitch starter’s mix and the ability to miss bats.

Perfect Game (3/9/19 Game Report):
Louisville's Saturday starter and one of their top draft prospects this year, lefthander Nick Bennett, had a solid if unspectacular rain-addled start against Boston College. The game ended up being postponed in the sixth inning with Louisville leading 10-0, and while Bennett was certainly effective, the stuff and command was a little vanilla in the poor weather conditions.

He's a big, physical lefthander with excellent size and strength throughout. The mechanical operation, however, has some kinks to iron out. He's stiff throughout his delivery, landing slightly closed off and really grinding through the plant leg to finish rotating. He also severely spine tilts towards the third base side to allow his arm to get up to near a high three-quarters slot, but the plane and angle he creates is at least moderately negated by the lack of command that delivery contributes to.

The operation isn't clean, as stated, but Bennett came into 2019 high on some draft boards for a reason, and he shows flashes of excellent stuff. He was up to 93 mph with his fastball early on in this one, settling into the 89-91 mph range for the most part with some valleys below and peaks above that range. It's expected that the velocity will tick up a bit as the weather warms, and it's well within reason to project a 55 fastball for him. He creates excellent angle to the plate, and while the lack of glove-side fastball command is problematic, he's able to miss bats with the fastball in the zone to some degree.

The off-speed stuff was all a bit inconsistent in this one – and it's important to point out again that the weather was not good – but there were flashes of a total arsenal of average-or-better pitches. He worked slider, curveball and changeup off of the fastball, and threw them all with regularity, something not seen from amateur pitchers very often. The slider was the best pitch on this day, thrown in the 78-80 mph range with good, late bite. It gets a little sweepy at times, and he will overthrow it at times, but the pitch showed 55 with some regularity and should be a bat-misser for him long term.

The curveball was a bit soft, thrown more in the 73-75 mph range with some sweep and depth to it. It's a fringy pitch right now because it's softer and not a bat-misser, but he can steal strikes with it and it pairs well with his slider. The changeup was likewise inconsistent, but flashed average a few times, thrown in the 80-82 mph range with good fade at the plate.

We're going to slot Bennett into roughly the fourth-round range on our next draft board update, though there is still the potential for him to rise significantly as the weather warms up and the quality of looks the scouts get on him improve. He shows flashes of throwing four at least near-average pitches for strikes with some remaining projection on all of them. The mechanical operation is concerning in some respects, but there is a lot to like about his profile, and he's still a pretty easy top five round talent with the ability to still climb boards this spring.

Baseball America:
A 40th-round pick of the Giants coming out of high school, Bennett has been one of the more durable and reliable pitchers in the ACC over the past three seasons. But in the lead-up to the draft, his durability suddenly became a question as he was held out for two weeks with a forearm strain. When he returned, his stuff and command was a tick below normal, and he allowed nine hits and six earned runs in his first 2.1 innings back on the mound. When he’s at his best, Bennett can attack hitters with a 90-92 mph fastball and above-average control. He mixes in a big, slow, above-average curveball that has the ability to lock up hitters. The command and consistency of his curveball helps the pitch play up because he can throw it for a strike in any count. He also has an average changeup. Bennett has long impressed scouts with his fearlessness on the mound, but his late-season swoon complicates his draft status.

Prep Baseball Report:
Physical lefty with a stiff delivery and open, off-balance landing. Muscles the ball to the plate to produce velocity. Despite the mechanical roughness, Bennett repeated his delivery for the first two innings and consistently released his pitches out front from a high three-quarter slot. Mixed his pitches to a variety of locations. Fastball sat 90-92 mph, topping at 93. Spotted the pitch down in zone and to both sides of the plate. Stayed on top and released out front his near average 74-77 mph curveball. Also, mixed in a fringe changeup at 83-86 mph. However, the third inning was a different story as Bennett started to miss spots, hit bats and was knocked from the game (2.1 IP, 9 H, 6 ER, 1BB, 2 SO). Overall, Bennett's delivery is likely to remain inconsistent going forward just as it was on this look. He profiles as a reliever in professional baseball and will likely be selected during the middle-to-later rounds on Day Two this June.


LINKS:


VIDEOS:





 Top
 
Offline  Re: 2019 Official Draft Pick Selection/Signing Thread
#7

Posted: June 04, 2019, 12:33 PM Post
User avatar

Resident Hipster
Global Moderator
Posts: 12394
ROUND 7 (223rd overall): Gabe Holt, CF

Image
(Photo: D1 Baseball)

Height: 5'10
Weight: 170
B/T: L/R
School: Texas Tech
Year: Sophomore
DOB: 1/7/98

SCOUTING REPORT:

MLB Pipeline:
While he lacks power, Holt is a disciplined hitter with solid contact skills and excellent speed, and he has spent his first two seasons at Texas Tech as the team’s regular leadoff man. Holt still has major strides to make on defense, however, as his ability to run hasn’t translated to a strong performance on that side of the ball after he transitioned from second base to the outfield late in his freshman year.

Perfect Game:
Holt has been an instant impact type of outfielder since he stepped foot on campus at Texas Tech and the speedy leadoff man has produced remarkably well over his first two seasons. The sophomore age-eligible prospect fits the profile of a leadoff type hitter with excellent speed and has been adjusting to life in the outfield this season after playing second base as a freshman. He has the athleticism to stick in the outfield but the key to his ultimate positional home will be how well he adjusts instinctively in how he reads and reacts to routes. The speed is plus and he has excellent instincts on the basepaths with close to 30 stolen bases his first season and well on his way to surpassing that mark this season. He makes an excellent amount of contact and has a knack for finding the barrel to go along with more walks than strikeouts in each of the past two years. There’s not much power to Holt’s profile but there doesn’t need to be as his speed, contact and on-base skills are more than enough for him to warrant a high draft selection.

Baseball America:
Holt took over as Texas Tech’s leadoff hitter from the first game of his freshman season and has been a steady presence as the Red Raiders’ table-setter ever since. He’s well-suited for the role as his ground-ball and line-drive approach relies on spreading the ball to all fields. Once he makes contact, his plus-plus speed and aggressive baserunning makes him a threat to always take the extra base. He’ll even turn grounders through the infield into doubles if the outfielders don’t charge aggressively enough. While Holt’s speed is easily his best tool, he has a chance to be an above-average hitter thanks to quick hands and a solid understanding of the strike zone. His power and his power potential are quite limited. His swing is not generally geared to driving the ball over the wall, as he has very little load. That’s probably smart because the 5-foot-10, 170-pounder doesn’t really have the size or strength to hit more than 5-10 home runs a year. Holt is an excellent basestealer who could top 60 steals in his first two seasons at Texas Tech. Defensively, Holt has yet to find a true home. He was Texas Tech’s second baseman for much of his freshman season, but he’s below-average there and will need to improve his actions and soften his hands to play there in pro ball. He’s spent most of the past year and a half in right field, but his routes and reads leave much to be desired. There is some belief among scouts that he could end up being better in center field as the reads of fly balls off the bat are easier. This year, he has spent a little time in center field and has even filled in at shortstop, although he didn’t look comfortable there. Holt’s profile won’t sell every team, as he lacks power and has no clear defensive position, but he can run and get on base.

Prep Baseball Report:
LHH with really quick hands, had quality at-bats with multiple knocks against one of the best arms in the SEC. Uses the whole field, average bat speed with excellent feel for the barrel and the ability to recognize spin. Can play multiple positions OF/2B with above average range and high end feel. Changes directions ultra-fast, accelerates easy, and can steal bags. Likely top of the order hitter in pro ball, can play all three outfield positions and possibly second base. Has been playing RF. Must play CF or 2B to have the most value. Likely 3-6th round pick, but his signability as a soph-eligible will play a large part in where he is ultimately selected.

Keith Law:
Holt has played some corner outfield but lacks the power for that spot, profiling better in the infield as a high-contact guy with plus speed. He helped his cause by getting three of the Red Raiders' four hits off Alek Manoah in an April matchup.


LINKS:


VIDEOS:



 Top
 
Offline  Re: 2019 Official Draft Pick Selection/Signing Thread
#8

Posted: June 04, 2019, 12:34 PM Post
User avatar

Resident Hipster
Global Moderator
Posts: 12394
ROUND 8 (253rd overall): David Hamilton, SS

Image
(Photo: Nick Wagner)

Height: 5'11
Weight: 170
B/T: L/R
School: Texas
Year: Junior
DOB: 9/29/97

SCOUTING REPORT:

Perfect Game:
The Longhorns of Texas were dealt a major blow before the season even started as they lost star shortstop David Hamilton following the rupture of his achilles. A team could still take a chance on Hamilton as he should be healed enough to report to professional baseball in a couple of months barring any setbacks. At his best, Hamilton is one of the best pure athletes in the draft with excellent speed along with plus defensive skills at shortstop. His hands, footwork, range and athleticism made him a human highlight reel while at Texas and profile him to be well above average middle infielder. His future at shortstop is somewhat in question due to limited arm strength. Hamilton doesn’t have good raw power but his approach is more contact-oriented anyway; he hit .291 last season with a 13-game hitting streak dating back to 2018. Hamilton likely would have been a top 2-3 round pick had he remained healthy but his injury throws his draft stock into flux as he’s a true wild card in where he’ll be selected and also whether or not he’ll sign.

Baseball America:
After making it to Omaha in 2018, Texas slipped back to 27-27 in 2019. One of the big reasons was the Longhorns missed Hamilton, who missed the entire season with a ruptured Achilles tendon. Hamilton’s injury obviously makes it difficult for teams to fully evaluate him, as his athleticism and speed were his best attributes. Hamilton is a lefthanded hitter who focuses on making plenty of contact while using his plus speed. Pre-injury Hamilton had a quick first step and the hands to stay at shortstop. Hamilton was overmatched as a hitter as a freshman and even with improvement as a sophomore, his lack of power is a concern in pro ball, and Hamilton didn’t get to allay those concerns as a junior. He could use a medical redshirt year and retain two years of eligibility if he doesn’t like where he goes in the draft.


LINKS:


VIDEOS:



 Top
 
Offline  Re: 2019 Official Draft Pick Selection/Signing Thread
#9

Posted: June 04, 2019, 12:34 PM Post
User avatar

Resident Hipster
Global Moderator
Posts: 12394
ROUND 9 (283rd overall): Darrien Miller, C

Image
(Photo: Twitter)

Height: 6'0
Weight: 175
B/T: L/R
School: Clovis HS (CA)
Year: Senior
DOB: 3/10/01

SCOUTING REPORT:

Perfect Game:
Darrien Miller is a 2019 C/RHP with a 6-0 175 lb. frame from Oakurst, CA who attends Clovis HS. Medium frame with an average build and room to add. Ran a 6.91 second 60-yard dash. Worked out defensively as a primary catcher. Long actions from a low and spread set up. Accurate carry to the bag topping out at 79 miles per hour. Lefthanded hitter with a slightly open stance and some big shift into contact. Good control of the barrel with some jump when squared and occasional lift out front. Righthanded pitcher with a simple side step delivery. Early hand break with a medium arm circle in back. Commands a straight fastball topping out at 83 miles per hour. Some tightness to a 12-to-6 curveball with some inconsistent break. Excellent student as well.

Prep Baseball Report:
Medium/Large frame that is rangy and athletic. Sits low in crouch behind the plate with ability to get out of it quickly. Showed athleticism picking it out wide from LHH batter’s box with MIF actions. Arm is strong average and accurate (1.97-2.02 Pop in multiple between inning looks). LHH with quiet setup with real strong feel for the barrel being able to manipulate it. 3 hits going to LCF gap for 1B on FB away then went RF line for 3B before 1B into RCF gap; all field approach. 10+ MLB scouts there to see him. / 2nd viewing; was once again spectacular. After squaring up 92 the night before for a triple he squared up 89 that one-hopped the center field wall for a double. Miller tried to extend it to a triple but a perfect relay got him at third. The hit, and the entire at-bat for that matter, showed Miller’s immense talent. The fastball was elevated and Miller was able to adjust his barrel path and square it up. He busted out of the box and was going to for three before he rounded first showing his excellent baserunning ability with tight around the bags. He threw out a runner defensively and made the play of the game on a foul ball pop up behind the plate where his technique in handling the ball was textbook.


LINKS:


VIDEOS:


 Top
 
Offline  Re: 2019 Official Draft Pick Selection/Signing Thread
#10

Posted: June 04, 2019, 12:34 PM Post
User avatar

Resident Hipster
Global Moderator
Posts: 12394
ROUND 10 (313th overall): Taylor Floyd, RHP

Image
(Photo: Texas Tech)

Height: 6'1
Weight: 185
B/T: R/R
School: Texas Tech
Year: Junior
DOB: 12/8/97

SCOUTING REPORT:

Baseball America:
Floyd is a low-slot 6-foot-1 junior righthander who thrives because he competes and gives hitters a difficult look from his odd release point. Floyd's 88-91 fastball is fringy, but he spots it arm-side and glove-side and the fastball sets up an average frisbee slider. He struck out 78 in his first 50.1 innings this season with a .230 average against and only one home run allowed. He projects as a lower-leverage situational righthander.


LINKS:


VIDEOS:



 Top
 
Offline  Re: 2019 Official Draft Pick Selection/Signing Thread
#11

Posted: June 05, 2019, 8:21 AM Post
User avatar

Resident Hipster
Global Moderator
Posts: 12394
ROUND 11 (343rd overall): Brock Begue, LHP

Image
(Photo: Cuyahoga Community College)

Height: 6'3
Weight: 210
B/T: R/L
School: Cuyahoga CC (OH)
Year: Sophomore
DOB: 4/1/99

SCOUTING REPORT:

Twitter:
Cuyahoga CC Baseball
@TriCBaseball
Feb 14
SO LHP Brock Begue
6'3" 205
FB: 87-90
+ CH
Good Slider
Was All-American in 2018
11-1, 2.07 ERA, 69.2 IP, 18 BB, 94 K

LINKS:

Brewers draft pick has no feeling on one side of his body, but that doesn't stop him from dominance on the mound


VIDEOS:





 Top
 
Offline  Re: 2019 Official Draft Pick Selection/Signing Thread
#12

Posted: June 05, 2019, 3:05 PM Post
User avatar

Resident Hipster
Global Moderator
Posts: 12394
ROUND 12 (373rd overall): Arman Sabouri, LHP

Image
(Photo: University of California)

Height: 5'10
Weight: 200
B/T: R/L
School: California
Year: Junior
DOB: 6/28/98

SCOUTING REPORT:

Twitter:
Andrew Krause
@akrause456
5 Oct 2015
2016 LHP Arman Sabouri (San Jose, CA) deceptive from 3/4 slot, 85-88 mph FB with good feel for 79 SL. Advanced pitchability. #Cal commit

LINKS:


VIDEOS:



 Top
 
Offline  Re: 2019 Official Draft Pick Selection/Signing Thread
#13

Posted: June 05, 2019, 3:05 PM Post
User avatar

Resident Hipster
Global Moderator
Posts: 12394
ROUND 13 (403rd overall): Jackson Gillis, LHP

Image
(Photo: Bart Boatwright)

Height: 6'3
Weight: 235
B/T: R/L
School: Vanderbilt
Year: Junior
DOB: 11/27/97

SCOUTING REPORT:

MLB Pipeline:
Gillis established himself as one of Vanderbilt's go-to relievers last season, but has been used sparingly in 2019. The left-hander has shown a fastball that sits at 92-95 mph and a solid curveball in the past. Gillis has also earned comparisons to former Vanderbilt pitcher Ben Bowden, who was drafted by the Rockies in the second round in 2016 and has pitched well for their Double-A Hartford affiliate this season.

Perfect Game:
Gillis hasn’t pitched much this year, totaling only seven innings out of the bullpen for the Commodores, but he may be one of those prospects who really doesn’t peak as a player until he gets into professional baseball. A well-built and physical lefthander, Gillis can reach the mid-90s with his fastball from the left side with excellent life, though inconsistencies in terms of strikes and off-speed stuff have limited his profile.

Baseball America:
Getting to pitch at a college baseball power like Vanderbilt is the dream of a lot of pitchers. The one danger in that since there are a lot of pitchers with that dream, if a player doesn’t perform, he doesn’t get to pitch. Gillis was 91-94 mph last year with a promising breaking ball. This year, he struggled with his command and his curveball is less impressive as well. As a result, he barely pitched, allowing six runs (four earned) in seven appearances. A team that has seen Gillis better could take a chance on landing him at a bargain, but it’s been hard for scouts to even see him pitch this year considering how rarely he’s been used.


LINKS:


VIDEOS:


 Top
 
Offline  Re: 2019 Official Draft Pick Selection/Signing Thread
#14

Posted: June 05, 2019, 3:06 PM Post
User avatar

Resident Hipster
Global Moderator
Posts: 12394
ROUND 14 (433rd overall): Paxton Schultz, RHP

Image
(Photo: Twitter)

Height: 6'3
Weight: 205
B/T: L/R
School: Utah Valley
Year: Junior
DOB: 1/5/98

SCOUTING REPORT:


LINKS:


VIDEOS:


 Top
 
Offline  Re: 2019 Official Draft Pick Selection/Signing Thread
#15

Posted: June 05, 2019, 3:06 PM Post
User avatar

Resident Hipster
Global Moderator
Posts: 12394
ROUND 15 (463rd overall): Cam Devanney, SS

Image
(Photo: Elon University)

Height: 6'1
Weight: 195
B/T: R/R
School: Elon University
Year: Senior
DOB: 4/13/97

SCOUTING REPORT:


LINKS:


VIDEOS:



 Top
 
Offline  Re: 2019 Official Draft Pick Selection/Signing Thread
#16

Posted: June 05, 2019, 3:07 PM Post
User avatar

Resident Hipster
Global Moderator
Posts: 12394
ROUND 16 (493rd overall): Mike Wilson, CF

Image
(Photo: SUNY Stony Brook)

Height: 6'0
Weight: 200
B/T: L/R
School: SUNY Stony Brook
Year: Junior
DOB: 3/29/98

SCOUTING REPORT:


LINKS:


VIDEOS:



 Top
 
Offline  Re: 2019 Official Draft Pick Selection/Signing Thread
#17

Posted: June 05, 2019, 3:07 PM Post
User avatar

Resident Hipster
Global Moderator
Posts: 12394
ROUND 17 (523rd overall): Kelvin Bender, LHP

Image
(Photo: Thomas R. Cordova)

Height: 5'11
Weight: 165
B/T: L/L
School: Junipero Serra HS (CA)
Year: Senior
DOB: 3/11/00

SCOUTING REPORT:

Perfect Game (10/8/18 Game Report):
Kelvin Bender (2019, Gardena, Calif.) was impressive with his command of both his fastball, which sat 82-85 mph, and a 1-to-7 shaped curveball, that he landed with consistency in the 70-72 mph range. For three innings of relief in game one of the tournament, Bender did not allow a hit and was in complete command of his arsenal to both halves of the plate. The UC Santa Barbara commit mixed his pitches well and kept the opposing hitters guessing where the next offering would be located. With the development of a true third pitch he could find himself vying for a starter’s role long-term.

Baseball America (10/22/18 Game Report):
A 5-foot-11, 155-pound lefthander, Bender's name is fitting, as he had plenty of scouts intrigued with his sharp, high spin-rate breaking ball. He gave the MLB Breakthrough Series club 3.2 innings of four hit, two run ball, with six strikeouts and no walks. The whiffs primarily coming against a 72-77 mph curveball with three-quarter shape and a spin rate that ranged from 2600-2900 rpm.

The pitch blended from a standard, three-quarter shape to a more sweeping, slurve offering but was routinely sharp and used effectively as a chase pitch and a backdoor curveball against righthanders. Bender showed solid feel to locate the offering for strikes throughout, but there were a few instances where he got around the outside of the pitch, rather than on top of it, and had it back up on him.

He pitched off of the breaking ball, but also threw a mid-80s fastball that touched 88 mph and mixed in an occasional changeup in the 70-74 mph range.

Prep Baseball Report (5/7/19 Game Report):
2019 UC Santa Barbara signee, LHP Kelvin Bender tossed a complete game, three hit gem, allowing three runs, walking five, and punching out Ten South hitters. Bender features a three-pitch mix coming out of a three quarter slot. Has athletic, slender frame with room for added muscle. Fastball was sitting 84-86, topping 87, and 88. Displays a plus curveball with tremendous shape and late bite that dominated on this day, 72-74, and mixed in a few fading changeups at 72-73.


LINKS:


VIDEOS:







 Top
 
Offline  Re: 2019 Official Draft Pick Selection/Signing Thread
#18

Posted: June 05, 2019, 3:08 PM Post
User avatar

Resident Hipster
Global Moderator
Posts: 12394
ROUND 18 (553rd overall): Ashton McGee, 2B

Image
(Photo: University of North Carolina)

Height: 6'1
Weight: 215
B/T: L/R
School: North Carolina
Year: Junior
DOB: 11/19/98

SCOUTING REPORT:

Perfect Game (4/25/19 Game Report):
McGee hasn’t enjoyed the high-level of success as he did as a freshman when he hit .327 with seven homers and 46 RBI. It’s clear the lefthanded hitter has a good idea of what he’s doing at the plate with a solid approach and the ability to drive the ball to all parts of the field. He has had more than 30 walks in each of his three seasons with the Tar Heels, including this year through only 41 games, leading to equally elevated on-base percentages.

Making consistent, hard contact has been a challenge for McGee since his freshman year but the moments have been there. He showed a glimpse of that in the top of the fifth of game two during UNC’s against Notre Dame, driving a no-doubt solo home run over the wall in right field after working the count to his favor. His value is increased by the fact that he has some defensive versatility, with the ability to play the corner outfield positions as well as both second and third base.


LINKS:


VIDEOS:


 Top
 
Offline  Re: 2019 Official Draft Pick Selection/Signing Thread
#19

Posted: June 05, 2019, 3:08 PM Post
User avatar

Resident Hipster
Global Moderator
Posts: 12394
ROUND 19 (583rd overall): Bryce Milligan, RHP

Image
(Photo: Oklahoma City University)

Height: 6'1
Weight: 165
B/T: R/R
School: Oklahoma City University
Year: Junior
DOB: 7/24/98

SCOUTING REPORT:


LINKS:


VIDEOS:


 Top
 
Offline  Re: 2019 Official Draft Pick Selection/Signing Thread
#20

Posted: June 05, 2019, 3:10 PM Post
User avatar

Resident Hipster
Global Moderator
Posts: 12394
ROUND 20 (613th overall): Myles Austin, SS

Image
(Photo: Perfect Game)

Height: 6'3
Weight: 180
B/T: R/R
School: Westlake HS (GA)
Year: Senior
DOB: 2/5/01

SCOUTING REPORT:

MLB Pipeline:
Austin has huge raw power from the right side and a lot of bat speed, impressive for a high school senior. A 6-foot-3, 185-pound shortstop, his body is still a little ahead of his hitting, as his swing can be long at times leaving him prone to swings-and-misses. But he has exciting potential at the plate. The Georgia native is an Alabama commit for next year. An average runner, he projects as an outfielder or third baseman.

Perfect Game:
Austin has a very long 6-foot-3, 177-pound build and looks even taller on the baseball field, especially as he’s gliding around the middle infield vacuuming up ground balls. The 2018 PG All-American has been a regular on the Perfect Game and national circuits since his freshman year but only really came into his own last summer as his physical strength and coordination caught up to his body and evaluators stopped projecting him to end up with his 90 mph fastball on the mound and began to think of him as a middle-of-the-field athlete. Austin’s next step is to continue to tap into the power that’s inside his loose and easy righthanded swing.

Baseball America:
A wiry, 6-foot-3, 184-pound infielder with plenty of athleticism, Austin is a projectable hitter out of Atlanta who currently has solid raw power that projects for plus as he continues to fill out his frame. There’s some swing-and-miss in Austin’s game, and his long levers might continue to worry scouts when paired with his aggressive tendencies, but there’s enough impact potential and bat speed to give him a high offensive ceiling. Defensively, he shows middle infield actions and quickness, but he currently has average arm strength with an unconventional arm slot. He may have to move off the position as he continues to get stronger and could wind up being a better fit for third base. He’s a plus runner underway with long, smooth strides on the bases, but he could take a step backwards in that department in the future as he fills out his lanky frame. Austin is polarizing among the scouting community, with some preferring to dream on his significant upside while others wonder if he’ll ever show enough consistent hitting ability to make the most of his raw tools. Austin is committed to Alabama.

Prep Baseball Report:
Lots to dream on with the frame. Long, lanky, and athletic with graceful movements like a basketball player. His speed was his best attribute over the course of the weekend and he stole several bags while running the bases at a high level. The actions at shortstop look natural and twitchy, and he has a strong arm (was up to 90 on the bump in August), although hands will need to improve for him to be an elite defender. Speed will definitely give him a chance to play the outfield, especially with how athletic and long his strides are. At the plate, he has a deeper load down and back before working flat through the zone with a slight scoop because he is still developing strength. Short to the ball with quick hands but also very quick out of the zone. Very intriguing because of the athleticism.


LINKS:


VIDEOS:


 Top
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Go to page 1, 2  Next  [ 40 posts ]  New Topic   Add Reply
Test
  


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests

You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search this forum (phpBB search):
Jump to:  
Search entire board (Google search):
Google
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group
Test